BRUCE LEE

BRUCE LEE

IP MAN

PRAYING MANTIS KUNG FU IS VERY SIMILAR TO WING CHUN; BOTH ARE REFERRED TO AS "STREET FIGHTING." 

RED DRAGON-SNAKE

BRUCE LEE

BRUCE LEE

BRUCE LEE

IP MAN IN DOJO

Dìzǐ Lóng Shé / 弟子 龙蛇

THE GRAND MASTER, IP MAN, SEEN HERE TRAINING THE ICONIC BUT YOUNG . . . BRUCE LEE IN A TRAINING APPLICATION (DRILL) CALLED "STICKY HANDS," IN WHICH YOU KEEP YOUR HANDS AND ARMS IN CONTACT WITH EACH OTHER'S OPPONENT WHILE ATTEMPTING TO STRIKE YOUR OPPONENT WITH THE HANDS OR ELBOWS WHILE SIMULTANEOUSLY BLOCKING YOUR OPPONENT'S ATTACKS.  THE DRILL IS DESIGNED TO INCREASE THE STUDENT'S AWARENESS OF HIS OR HER OPPONENT'S MOVEMENTS SO THAT THE STUDENT LEARNS TO INTUITIVELY PERCEIVE WHEN, WHERE, AND HOW HE OR SHE WILL BE ATTACKED, & RESPOND TO THESE ATTACKS WITH AN INSTINCTIVE BLOCK & COUNTERATTACK.  IT IS AN "OFFENSIVE DEFENSE" OR A "DEFENSIVE OFFENSE."

IP MAN'S ADVICE TO ALL MARTIAL ARTISTS

BRUCE LEE'S CONCEPT OF THE "STOP-KICK" IN WHICH YOUR OPPONENT ADVANCES UPON YOU WITH ONE LEG ALWAYS IN THE LEADING POSITION:  THIS LEG IS YOUR CLOSEST TARGET SO KICK THE KNEECAP OF THAT LEADING LEG BY EITHER A STRAIGHT LINE UPWARD KICK IN WHICH THE TOP PART OF YOUR FOOT LANDS JUST UNDER THE OPPONENT'S KNEE CAP THEREBY DISPLACING THE KNEE CAP, OR KICK IN A DOWNWARD DIRECTION TOWARDS THE OPPONENT'S KNEECAP THEREBY CREATING A COMPOUND FRACTURE OF YOUR OPPONENT'S LEADING LEG.  JUST IN CASE YOUR OFFENSIVE DEFENSE KICK IS NOT POWERFUL ENOUGH TO HAVE THE INTENDED EFFECT ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS FOLLOW THROUGH WITH A SERIES OF SON-FIST "CHAIN" PUNCHES TO THE OPPONENT'S NOSE, FACE, AND UPPER BODY - WHEREVER YOU CAN GET AN EFFECTIVE STRIKE IN.

BRUCE LEE'S CONCEPT OF THE "STOP-KICK" IN WHICH YOUR OPPONENT ADVANCES UPON YOU WITH ONE LEG ALWAYS IN THE LEADING POSITION:  THIS LEG IS YOUR CLOSEST TARGET SO KICK THE KNEECAP OF THAT LEADING LEG BY EITHER A STRAIGHT LINE UPWARD KICK IN WHICH THE TOP PART OF YOUR FOOT LANDS JUST UNDER THE OPPONENT'S KNEE CAP THEREBY DISPLACING THE KNEE CAP, OR KICK IN A DOWNWARD DIRECTION TOWARDS THE OPPONENT'S KNEECAP THEREBY CREATING A COMPOUND FRACTURE OF YOUR OPPONENT'S LEADING LEG.  JUST IN CASE YOUR OFFENSIVE DEFENSE KICK IS NOT POWERFUL ENOUGH TO HAVE THE INTENDED EFFECT ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS FOLLOW THROUGH WITH A SERIES OF SON-FIST "CHAIN" PUNCHES TO THE OPPONENT'S NOSE, FACE, AND UPPER BODY - WHEREVER YOU CAN GET AN EFFECTIVE STRIKE IN.

Siddhartha Gautama, who would one day become known as "THE Buddha" ("the enlightened one" or "the awakened  one"), lived in Nepal during the 6th to 4th century B.C..  According to historical facts of his life, after experimenting with several different teachings for many years, and finding none of them to be GENUINELY INSIGHTFUL, Siddhartha Gautama spent all night in DEEP MEDITATION.  During This meditation, all of the answers he had been seeking became clear because he discovered that the PEACE of meditation was what he had been seeking all along, and he thus achieved full awareness, thereby becoming "Buddha."  However, as all Buddhas (and "Buddhists") KNOW, there were an INFINITE NUMBER of Buddhas PRIOR to Siddhartha Gautama, and there will be an INFINITE NUMBER of Buddhas AFTER him, because he was NOT (nor did he ever claim to be) a deity, god, prophet, or any such celestial being.  He only claimed to be a common person who suddenly saw ALL components of the universe (even an apparently stagnant rock with electrons shooting around their nuclei at several times the speed of light) as being in a CONSTANT state of dynamic change, and thus he saw the opportunity to GUIDE the changes within himself - NOT towards bliss or misery, but instead, towards TRULY PROFOUND, DEEPLY SEATED, UNYIELDING PEACE, through the ART of MINDFUL MEDITATION during which one focuses on this very moment rather than dwelling on the past or worrying about the future.  Then, as all Buddhas do, he set forth to teach everyone he could reach about how to acquire this enlightened insight and its resultant steady state of PEACEFULNESS that does not waiver with even the strongest winds!  All of us, including MEN, WOMEN, BOYS, GIRLS, TRANSGENDER PEOPLE,  and EVERYONE else of ANY religious conviction or faith including Christians, Muslims, and atheists have a Buddha, awaiting within, for the moment that we CHOOSE to let this Buddha SHINE his or her INNER ENERGY (Chi / Qi) & the LIGHT of that energy and BEAUTY out for all to bear witness of so that they too can live in PEACE

The embodiment of compassion, Kwan Yin is known as “she who hears the cries of the world.”  One of Buddhism’s most beloved bodhisattvas, she also holds a special place in the hearts of people of other faiths, including Daoists and Confucianists.  Kwan Yin is the protector of women, children, sailors, fishermen, anyone in trouble, and the sick, disabled, and poor.  Some Buddhist schools present her as male and female interchangeably.   The idea is that a bodhisattva—a being of great realization who vows to forego enlightenment until all sentient beings are liberated—can manifest in whatever form will most effectively free beings from suffering.  Kwan Yin originated in India as Avalokiteshvara, the male bodhisattva of compassion.  He was introduced to China in the early centuries of the Common Era, but apparently there was a hunger for a feminine face of compassion, and by the eighth century female forms of Avalokiteshvara emerged.  By the ninth century, Kwan Yin had become the main representation of compassion in China, and from there her veneration spread across Asia.  Eventually, she became known by many names, including Kannon in Japan and Quan Am in Vietnam.  According to legend, Kwan Yin tried so strenuously to alleviate the suffering of beings that her head split into eleven pieces.  Wanting to help, Amitabha Buddha awarded her eleven heads with which to hear the cries of the world, but when she heard all the cries and reached out to address the needs of so many, her two arms shattered.  This time, Amitabha gave Kwan Yin a thousand arms, and it’s said that even now she’s still using those arms to offer her compassion and GRACE to all.

BRUCE LEE

The embodiment of compassion, Kwan Yin is known as “she who hears the cries of the world.”  One of Buddhism’s most beloved bodhisattvas, she also holds a special place in the hearts of people of other faiths, including Daoists and Confucianists.  Kwan Yin is the protector of women, children, sailors, fishermen, anyone in trouble, and the sick, disabled, and poor.  Some Buddhist schools present her as male and female interchangeably.   The idea is that a bodhisattva—a being of great realization who vows to forego enlightenment until all sentient beings are liberated—can manifest in whatever form will most effectively free beings from suffering.  Kwan Yin originated in India as Avalokiteshvara, the male bodhisattva of compassion.  He was introduced to China in the early centuries of the Common Era, but apparently there was a hunger for a feminine face of compassion, and by the eighth century female forms of Avalokiteshvara emerged.  By the ninth century, Kwan Yin had become the main representation of compassion in China, and from there her veneration spread across Asia.  Eventually, she became known by many names, including Kannon in Japan and Quan Am in Vietnam.  According to legend, Kwan Yin tried so strenuously to alleviate the suffering of beings that her head split into eleven pieces.  Wanting to help, Amitabha Buddha awarded her eleven heads with which to hear the cries of the world, but when she heard all the cries and reached out to address the needs of so many, her two arms shattered.  This time, Amitabha gave Kwan Yin a thousand arms, and it’s said that even now she’s still using those arms to offer her compassion and GRACE to all.

The embodiment of compassion, Kwan Yin is known as “she who hears the cries of the world.”  One of Buddhism’s most beloved bodhisattvas, she also holds a special place in the hearts of people of other faiths, including Daoists and Confucianists.  Kwan Yin is the protector of women, children, sailors, fishermen, anyone in trouble, and the sick, disabled, and poor.  Some Buddhist schools present her as male and female interchangeably.   The idea is that a bodhisattva—a being of great realization who vows to forego enlightenment until all sentient beings are liberated—can manifest in whatever form will most effectively free beings from suffering.  Kwan Yin originated in India as Avalokiteshvara, the male bodhisattva of compassion.  He was introduced to China in the early centuries of the Common Era, but apparently there was a hunger for a feminine face of compassion, and by the eighth century female forms of Avalokiteshvara emerged.  By the ninth century, Kwan Yin had become the main representation of compassion in China, and from there her veneration spread across Asia.  Eventually, she became known by many names, including Kannon in Japan and Quan Am in Vietnam.  According to legend, Kwan Yin tried so strenuously to alleviate the suffering of beings that her head split into eleven pieces.  Wanting to help, Amitabha Buddha awarded her eleven heads with which to hear the cries of the world, but when she heard all the cries and reached out to address the needs of so many, her two arms shattered.  This time, Amitabha gave Kwan Yin a thousand arms, and it’s said that even now she’s still using those arms to offer her compassion and GRACE to all.

The embodiment of compassion, Kwan Yin is known as “she who hears the cries of the world.”  One of Buddhism’s most beloved bodhisattvas, she also holds a special place in the hearts of people of other faiths, including Daoists and Confucianists.  Kwan Yin is the protector of women, children, sailors, fishermen, anyone in trouble, and the sick, disabled, and poor.  Some Buddhist schools present her as male and female interchangeably.   The idea is that a bodhisattva—a being of great realization who vows to forego enlightenment until all sentient beings are liberated—can manifest in whatever form will most effectively free beings from suffering.  Kwan Yin originated in India as Avalokiteshvara, the male bodhisattva of compassion.  He was introduced to China in the early centuries of the Common Era, but apparently there was a hunger for a feminine face of compassion, and by the eighth century female forms of Avalokiteshvara emerged.  By the ninth century, Kwan Yin had become the main representation of compassion in China, and from there her veneration spread across Asia.  Eventually, she became known by many names, including Kannon in Japan and Quan Am in Vietnam.  According to legend, Kwan Yin tried so strenuously to alleviate the suffering of beings that her head split into eleven pieces.  Wanting to help, Amitabha Buddha awarded her eleven heads with which to hear the cries of the world, but when she heard all the cries and reached out to address the needs of so many, her two arms shattered.  This time, Amitabha gave Kwan Yin a thousand arms, and it’s said that even now she’s still using those arms to offer her compassion and GRACE to all.

The embodiment of compassion, Kwan Yin is known as “she who hears the cries of the world.”  One of Buddhism’s most beloved bodhisattvas, she also holds a special place in the hearts of people of other faiths, including Daoists and Confucianists.  Kwan Yin is the protector of women, children, sailors, fishermen, anyone in trouble, and the sick, disabled, and poor.  Some Buddhist schools present her as male and female interchangeably.   The idea is that a bodhisattva—a being of great realization who vows to forego enlightenment until all sentient beings are liberated—can manifest in whatever form will most effectively free beings from suffering.  Kwan Yin originated in India as Avalokiteshvara, the male bodhisattva of compassion.  He was introduced to China in the early centuries of the Common Era, but apparently there was a hunger for a feminine face of compassion, and by the eighth century female forms of Avalokiteshvara emerged.  By the ninth century, Kwan Yin had become the main representation of compassion in China, and from there her veneration spread across Asia.  Eventually, she became known by many names, including Kannon in Japan and Quan Am in Vietnam.  According to legend, Kwan Yin tried so strenuously to alleviate the suffering of beings that her head split into eleven pieces.  Wanting to help, Amitabha Buddha awarded her eleven heads with which to hear the cries of the world, but when she heard all the cries and reached out to address the needs of so many, her two arms shattered.  This time, Amitabha gave Kwan Yin a thousand arms, and it’s said that even now she’s still using those arms to offer her compassion and GRACE to all.

Ziyi Zhang / Xiyi Xang, martial artist, contortionist, model and actress (and even though she is unaware of it, she will soon be my WIFE!!!    :-D Shown here in the movie "The Grand Master" about Ip Man, Wing Chun, and her character's fight for inner peace.

Ballet dancing, like Martial Arts, involves discipline, practice, perseverance, dedication, passion, strength, balance, agility, flexibility, inherent beauty, and precision.

Ballet dancing, like Martial Arts, involves discipline, practice, perseverance, dedication, passion, strength, balance, agility, flexibility, inherent beauty, and precision.

Ballet dancing, like Martial Arts, involves discipline, practice, perseverance, dedication, passion, strength, balance, agility, flexibility, inherent beauty, and precision.

Traditional Chinese Art

BRUCE LEE

ANIME ORIGINATED AS A JAPANESE ART FORM THAT INITIALLY WAS POPULAR WITH JAPANESE TEENAGERS BUT SOON BECAME VERY POPULAR IN AMERICA EVEN WITH ADULTS.  IN THIS ANIME PICTURE A CHINESE YOUNG LADY IS SHOWN PERFORMING KUNG FU IN A TRADITIONAL CHINESE DRESS / ROBE / CLOAK.

Contortion, like Martial Arts, involves discipline, practice, perseverance, dedication, passion, strength, balance, agility, flexibility, inherent beauty, and precision.

Contortion, like Martial Arts, involves discipline, practice, perseverance, dedication, passion, strength, balance, agility, flexibility, inherent beauty, and precision.

Contortion, like Martial Arts, involves discipline, practice, perseverance, dedication, passion, strength, balance, agility, flexibility, inherent beauty, and precision.

Known as “Kayla“ on the HBO hit series “The Game of Thrones,” but “Pixie Le Knot” on her website and "Jennifer Keith" in real life, she demonstrates that she’s more than just a pretty face; she is one of the most flexible contortionists in the UK at the age of 26 years old.   Contortion, like Martial Arts, involves discipline, practice, perseverance, dedication, passion, strength, balance, agility, flexibility, inherent beauty, and precision.

Ballet dancing,  like Martial Arts, involves discipline, practice, perseverance, dedication, passion, strength, balance, agility, flexibility, inherent beauty, and precision.

Donnie Yen in the movie Ip Man 1

Female Samurai

The 108-meter sea Guanyin Tower in Nanshan District , Sanya City, Hainan Province , was built in 2005:  The embodiment of compassion, Kwan Yin is known as “she who hears the cries of the world.”  One of Buddhism’s most beloved bodhisattvas, she also holds a special place in the hearts of people of other faiths, including Daoists and Confucianists.  Kwan Yin is the protector of women, children, sailors, fishermen, anyone in trouble, and the sick, disabled, and poor.  Some Buddhist schools present her as male and female interchangeably.   The idea is that a bodhisattva—a being of great realization who vows to forego enlightenment until all sentient beings are liberated—can manifest in whatever form will most effectively free beings from suffering.  Kwan Yin originated in India as Avalokiteshvara, the male bodhisattva of compassion.  He was introduced to China in the early centuries of the Common Era, but apparently there was a hunger for a feminine face of compassion, and by the eighth century female forms of Avalokiteshvara emerged.  By the ninth century, Kwan Yin had become the main representation of compassion in China, and from there her veneration spread across Asia.  Eventually, she became known by many names, including Kannon in Japan and Quan Am in Vietnam.  According to legend, Kwan Yin tried so strenuously to alleviate the suffering of beings that her head split into eleven pieces.  Wanting to help, Amitabha Buddha awarded her eleven heads with which to hear the cries of the world, but when she heard all the cries and reached out to address the needs of so many, her two arms shattered.  This time, Amitabha gave Kwan Yin a thousand arms, and it’s said that even now she’s still using those arms to offer her compassion and GRACE to all.

Donnie Yen in his role as Ip Man in the movie Ip Man 2.

Donnie Yen in his role as Ip Man in the movie Ip Man 1.

IP MAN

TRADITIONAL JAPANESE ART

The movie, "Fearless," also known as "Huo Yuanjia," "霍元甲" in Chinese, and as Jet Li's Fearless in the United Kingdom and in the United States, is a 2006 Chinese-Hong Kong martial arts film directed by Ronny Yu and starring Jet Li.  It is loosely based on the life of Huo Yuanjia, a Chinese martial artist who challenged foreign fighters in highly publicized events, restoring pride and nationalism to China at a time when Western imperialism and Japanese manipulation were eroding the country in the final years of the Qing Dynasty before the birth of the Republic of China.  Li stated in an interview that the film was his last Wushu martial arts epic, a point also made in the film's television promotions and other publicity.  A picture, recently released, allegedly showing the famed martial artist looking very old and frail has alarmed fans and raised questions about the 55-year-old action star’s health.  Long known for his youthful looks and acrobatic moves which spanned decades of action movies, Li — also known as "Li Lianjie" — has in recent years battled hyperthyroidism, a condition that causes fatigue and weight loss. The condition has previously ignited rumors of Li’s declining health.  But Li’s manager refuted the rumors, and offered what he said was a recent photo of the star.  And Li himself has weighed in: On Wednesday, a message appeared on his Facebook page thanking people for their concern about his health.  “I’m doing great and feeling great!” the message said.

The embodiment of compassion, Kwan Yin is known as “she who hears the cries of the world.”  One of Buddhism’s most beloved bodhisattvas, she also holds a special place in the hearts of people of other faiths, including Daoists and Confucianists.  Kwan Yin is the protector of women, children, sailors, fishermen, anyone in trouble, and the sick, disabled, and poor.  Some Buddhist schools present her as male and female interchangeably.   The idea is that a bodhisattva—a being of great realization who vows to forego enlightenment until all sentient beings are liberated—can manifest in whatever form will most effectively free beings from suffering.  Kwan Yin originated in India as Avalokiteshvara, the male bodhisattva of compassion.  He was introduced to China in the early centuries of the Common Era, but apparently there was a hunger for a feminine face of compassion, and by the eighth century female forms of Avalokiteshvara emerged.  By the ninth century, Kwan Yin had become the main representation of compassion in China, and from there her veneration spread across Asia.  Eventually, she became known by many names, including Kannon in Japan and Quan Am in Vietnam.  According to legend, Kwan Yin tried so strenuously to alleviate the suffering of beings that her head split into eleven pieces.  Wanting to help, Amitabha Buddha awarded her eleven heads with which to hear the cries of the world, but when she heard all the cries and reached out to address the needs of so many, her two arms shattered.  This time, Amitabha gave Kwan Yin a thousand arms, and it’s said that even now she’s still using those arms to offer her compassion and GRACE to all.

Kung Fu class in China - MUCH more challenging than their American brothers in Martial Arts!

KUNG FU MAN

A Peaceful Gnostic Girl Meditating by a Creek of the Living Water of Christ While Using Progressive Mindful Meditative Relaxation, Affirmative Prayer, & Spiritual Baptism, as she shines her radiant beauty.

The embodiment of compassion, Kwan Yin is known as “she who hears the cries of the world.”  One of Buddhism’s most beloved bodhisattvas, she also holds a special place in the hearts of people of other faiths, including Daoists and Confucianists.  Kwan Yin is the protector of women, children, sailors, fishermen, anyone in trouble, and the sick, disabled, and poor.  Some Buddhist schools present her as male and female interchangeably.   The idea is that a bodhisattva—a being of great realization who vows to forego enlightenment until all sentient beings are liberated—can manifest in whatever form will most effectively free beings from suffering.  Kwan Yin originated in India as Avalokiteshvara, the male bodhisattva of compassion.  He was introduced to China in the early centuries of the Common Era, but apparently there was a hunger for a feminine face of compassion, and by the eighth century female forms of Avalokiteshvara emerged.  By the ninth century, Kwan Yin had become the main representation of compassion in China, and from there her veneration spread across Asia.  Eventually, she became known by many names, including Kannon in Japan and Quan Am in Vietnam.  According to legend, Kwan Yin tried so strenuously to alleviate the suffering of beings that her head split into eleven pieces.  Wanting to help, Amitabha Buddha awarded her eleven heads with which to hear the cries of the world, but when she heard all the cries and reached out to address the needs of so many, her two arms shattered.  This time, Amitabha gave Kwan Yin a thousand arms, and it’s said that even now she’s still using those arms to offer her compassion and GRACE to all.

SHAOLIN KUNG FU KID

SHAOLIN KUNG FU MAN

Known as “Kayla“ on the HBO hit series “The Game of Thrones,” but “Pixie Le Knot” on her website and "Jennifer Keith" in real life, she demonstrates that she’s more than just a pretty face; she is one of the most flexible contortionists in the UK at the age of 26 years old.   Contortion, like Martial Arts, involves discipline, practice, perseverance, dedication, passion, strength, balance, agility, flexibility, inherent beauty, and precision.

Known as “Kayla“ on the HBO hit series “The Game of Thrones,” but “Pixie Le Knot” on her website and "Jennifer Keith" in real life, she demonstrates that she’s more than just a pretty face; she is one of the most flexible contortionists in the UK at the age of 26 years old.   Contortion, like Martial Arts, involves discipline, practice, perseverance, dedication, passion, strength, balance, agility, flexibility, inherent beauty, and precision.

Known as “Kayla“ on the HBO hit series “The Game of Thrones,” but “Pixie Le Knot” on her website and "Jennifer Keith" in real life, she demonstrates that she’s more than just a pretty face; she is one of the most flexible contortionists in the UK at the age of 26 years old.   Contortion, like Martial Arts, involves discipline, practice, perseverance, dedication, passion, strength, balance, agility, flexibility, inherent beauty, and precision.

Known as “Kayla“ on the HBO hit series “The Game of Thrones,” but “Pixie Le Knot” on her website and "Jennifer Keith" in real life, she demonstrates that she’s more than just a pretty face; she is one of the most flexible contortionists in the UK at the age of 26 years old.   Contortion, like Martial Arts, involves discipline, practice, perseverance, dedication, passion, strength, balance, agility, flexibility, inherent beauty, and precision.

Known as “Kayla“ on the HBO hit series “The Game of Thrones,” but “Pixie Le Knot” on her website and "Jennifer Keith" in real life, she demonstrates that she’s more than just a pretty face; she is one of the most flexible contortionists in the UK at the age of 26 years old.   Contortion, like Martial Arts, involves discipline, practice, perseverance, dedication, passion, strength, balance, agility, flexibility, inherent beauty, and precision.

TAI-CHI (QI) MASTER

Tony Leung, costarring with Ziyi Zhang / Xiyi Xang in the movie "The Grand Master" in which Mr. Leung played a younger, more charismatic version of Ip Man.

TRADITIONAL CHINESE ART OF A TRADITIONAL CHINESE DRAGON

TRADITIONAL CHINESE ART

WING CHUN

WUSHU WOMAN

Ziyi Zhang / Xiyi Xang in her role in the movie "House of Flying Daggers."

Ziyi Zhang / Xiyi Xang

Ziyi Zhang / Xiyi Xang in her role in the movie "House of Flying Daggers."

Ziyi Zhang / Xiyi Xang in her role in the movie "House of Flying Daggers."

Chun-Li, simplified Chinese: 春丽; traditional Chinese: 春麗; pinyin: Chūn Lì is a character in Capcom’s Street Fighter series. The first female fighter of any fighting game franchise, she made her first appearance in Street Fighter II: The World Warrior in 1991. In the series, she is an expert martial artist of Wing Chun, although many of her moves are not Wing Chun.  She is an “Interpol Officer” who restlessly seeks revenge for the death of her father at the hands of the nefarious M. Bison, leader of the Shadaloo crime syndicate. 

THE GREEN NINJA GIRL

Known as “Kayla“ on the HBO hit series “The Game of Thrones,” but “Pixie Le Knot” on her website and "Jennifer Keith" in real life, she demonstrates that she’s more than just a pretty face; she is one of the most flexible contortionists in the UK at the age of 26 years old.   Contortion, like Martial Arts, involves discipline, practice, perseverance, dedication, passion, strength, balance, agility, flexibility, inherent beauty, and precision.

PRETTY IN PINK

CHINESE GIRL IN A VERY SHORT BUT TRADITIONAL CHINESE DRESS DRAWN SIMILAR TO ANIME CHARACTERS

SHAOLIN KUNG FU GUY IN ARIAL KICK

BLUE MARTIAL ARTS WARRIOR

Ziyi Zhang / Xiyi Xang in House of Flying Daggers

Ziyi Zhang / Xiyi Xang - Chinese Martial Artist, Actress, and although she probably wouldn't refer to herself as a contortionist, she certainly comes close as she models for this popular picture which had to be edited due to its originally small dimensions and pixels showing.

Luk Dim Boon Kwun / 6 & a 1/2 Point Dragon Pole - Donnie Yen in Ip Man

Butterfly Swords / Baat Cham Dao - Donnie Yen in Ip Man

Tony Leung as Ip Man in the movie "The Grand Master" starring with Ziyi Zhang

Tony Leung as Ip Man in the movie "The Grand Master" starring with Ziyi Zhang

Tony Leung as Ip Man in the movie "The Grand Master" starring with Ziyi Zhang

Tony Leung as Ip Man in the movie "The Grand Master" starring with Ziyi Zhang

Tony Leung as Ip Man in the movie "The Grand Master" starring with Ziyi Zhang

Mak Yan Jong of Wing Chun

Titled, "Forgiven"  This is a picture that portrays the way Christ is willing to hold us up on our feet when we aren't strong enough to make it on our own.

The embodiment of compassion, Kwan Yin is known as “she who hears the cries of the world.”  One of Buddhism’s most beloved bodhisattvas, she also holds a special place in the hearts of people of other faiths, including Daoists and Confucianists.  Kwan Yin is the protector of women, children, sailors, fishermen, anyone in trouble, and the sick, disabled, and poor.  Some Buddhist schools present her as male and female interchangeably.   The idea is that a bodhisattva—a being of great realization who vows to forego enlightenment until all sentient beings are liberated—can manifest in whatever form will most effectively free beings from suffering.  Kwan Yin originated in India as Avalokiteshvara, the male bodhisattva of compassion.  He was introduced to China in the early centuries of the Common Era, but apparently there was a hunger for a feminine face of compassion, and by the eighth century female forms of Avalokiteshvara emerged.  By the ninth century, Kwan Yin had become the main representation of compassion in China, and from there her veneration spread across Asia.  Eventually, she became known by many names, including Kannon in Japan and Quan Am in Vietnam.  According to legend, Kwan Yin tried so strenuously to alleviate the suffering of beings that her head split into eleven pieces.  Wanting to help, Amitabha Buddha awarded her eleven heads with which to hear the cries of the world, but when she heard all the cries and reached out to address the needs of so many, her two arms shattered.  This time, Amitabha gave Kwan Yin a thousand arms, and it’s said that even now she’s still using those arms to offer her compassion and GRACE to all.

Portrait of a Chinese castle set in burnt wood and carved out.

The Crow:  Carrier of Souls to the Other Side.

Buddha Under the Bodhi Tree

Buddha Under the Bodhi Tree

Dàshī, Chúnjié de Zhìhuì (The Grand Master, Wisdom of Purity, inside her Temple) inside Wǒ de Shèng diàn.  

Dashi was once a mortal human but transcended human mortality by becoming one with water.  Her temple is located out in the vast ocean but is surrounded by a "cube" of water that refracts light such that no one can see her temple while sailing by.  If someone should try to enter her temple without permission to do so the temple's walls, ceiling, and floor change from being as peaceful as water in a resting puddle to the furiosity of a tsunami which is powerful enough to keep out any invaders.  When you need to be nurtured call upon her name and she will bring you into her temple and massage your scalp with the gently flowing warm water of her hands.  When you need intuitivem esoteric wisdom call upon her and she will slowly teach you the art of becoming living water as Christ first demonstrated.  She is a spiritual guide, and her temple is a place of refuge and rest.

Dàshī, Chúnjié de Zhìhuì (The Grand Master, Wisdom of Purity, inside her Temple) inside Wǒ de Shèng diàn.  

Dashi was once a mortal human but transcended human mortality by becoming one with water.  Her temple is located out in the vast ocean but is surrounded by a "cube" of water that refracts light such that no one can see her temple while sailing by.  If someone should try to enter her temple without permission to do so the temple's walls, ceiling, and floor change from being as peaceful as water in a resting puddle to the furiosity of a tsunami which is powerful enough to keep out any invaders.  When you need to be nurtured call upon her name and she will bring you into her temple and massage your scalp with the gently flowing warm water of her hands.  When you need intuitivem esoteric wisdom call upon her and she will slowly teach you the art of becoming living water as Christ first demonstrated.  She is a spiritual guide, and her temple is a place of refuge and rest.

Wing Chun Warrior vs. Japanese Ninja Karate

The Grand Master, Ip Man, standing in front of his mansion holding Baat Cham Do Butterfly Swords, next to his Mak Yan Jong Wooden Dummy.

FIST OF LEGEND STARING JET LI

FIST OF LEGEND STARING JET LI

FIST OF LEGEND STARING JET LI

FIST OF LEGEND STARING JET LI

FIST OF LEGEND STARING JET LI

FIST OF LEGEND STARING JET LI

FIST OF LEGEND STARING JET LI

FIST OF LEGEND STARING LET LI

FIST OF LEGEND STARING JET LI

FIST OF LEGEND STARING JET LI

FIST OF LEGEND STARING JET LI

FIST OF LEGEND STARING JET LI

FIST OF LEGEND STARING JET LI

Yanin “Jeeja” Vismitananda (born March 31, 1984) is a Thai actress & martial artist who specializes in Taekwondo (but uses Jeet Kune Do Kung Fu in this movie). She plays the character Yanin Mitananda in the movie Chocolate, in which she is a young girl with autism and what is typiclly called by a seemingly derogratory term, “Idiot Savant.” This term is not ment to be insulting and it refers to a person who has a mental or learning disability and may have severe difficulties with the “simple” tasks of daily living but is EXTREMELY gifted in a one specific way, such as the performing of feats of memory or calculation. In this movie the character she plays is an autistic girl who learns martial arts from watching it on TV (Bruce Lee movies) and by watching some muay thai competitors kick at punching bags. She only needs to see the martial arts moves a few times and then she is able to replicate the move at just the right instant. I feel that this is the greatest martial arts movie ever made and it is an injustice that it has not received the popularity and awards that it deserves. This picture is intended to blend digital art with a slight bit of impressionism showing the "mood" of the motion. 

Yanin “Jeeja” Vismitananda (born March 31, 1984) is a Thai actress & martial artist who specializes in Taekwondo (but uses Jeet Kune Do Kung Fu in this movie). She plays the character Yanin Mitananda in the movie Chocolate, in which she is a young girl with autism and what is typiclly called by a seemingly derogratory term, “Idiot Savant.” This term is not ment to be insulting and it refers to a person who has a mental or learning disability and may have severe difficulties with the “simple” tasks of daily living but is EXTREMELY gifted in a one specific way, such as the performing of feats of memory or calculation. In this movie the character she plays is an autistic girl who learns martial arts from watching it on TV (Bruce Lee movies) and by watching some muay thai competitors kick at punching bags. She only needs to see the martial arts moves a few times and then she is able to replicate the move at just the right instant. I feel that this is the greatest martial arts movie ever made and it is an injustice that it has not received the popularity and awards that it deserves. This picture is intended to blend digital art with a slight bit of impressionism showing the "mood" of the motion. 

Yanin “Jeeja” Vismitananda (born March 31, 1984) is a Thai actress & martial artist who specializes in Taekwondo (but uses Jeet Kune Do Kung Fu in this movie). She plays the character Yanin Mitananda in the movie Chocolate, in which she is a young girl with autism and what is typiclly called by a seemingly derogratory term, “Idiot Savant.” This term is not ment to be insulting and it refers to a person who has a mental or learning disability and may have severe difficulties with the “simple” tasks of daily living but is EXTREMELY gifted in a one specific way, such as the performing of feats of memory or calculation. In this movie the character she plays is an autistic girl who learns martial arts from watching it on TV (Bruce Lee movies) and by watching some muay thai competitors kick at punching bags. She only needs to see the martial arts moves a few times and then she is able to replicate the move at just the right instant. I feel that this is the greatest martial arts movie ever made and it is an injustice that it has not received the popularity and awards that it deserves. This picture is intended to blend digital art with a slight bit of impressionism showing the "mood" of the motion. 

Yanin “Jeeja” Vismitananda (born March 31, 1984) is a Thai actress & martial artist who specializes in Taekwondo (but uses Jeet Kune Do Kung Fu in this movie). She plays the character Yanin Mitananda in the movie Chocolate, in which she is a young girl with autism and what is typiclly called by a seemingly derogratory term, “Idiot Savant.” This term is not ment to be insulting and it refers to a person who has a mental or learning disability and may have severe difficulties with the “simple” tasks of daily living but is EXTREMELY gifted in a one specific way, such as the performing of feats of memory or calculation. In this movie the character she plays is an autistic girl who learns martial arts from watching it on TV (Bruce Lee movies) and by watching some muay thai competitors kick at punching bags. She only needs to see the martial arts moves a few times and then she is able to replicate the move at just the right instant. I feel that this is the greatest martial arts movie ever made and it is an injustice that it has not received the popularity and awards that it deserves. This picture is intended to blend digital art with a slight bit of impressionism showing the "mood" of the motion. 

Yanin “Jeeja” Vismitananda (born March 31, 1984) is a Thai actress & martial artist who specializes in Taekwondo (but uses Jeet Kune Do Kung Fu in this movie). She plays the character Yanin Mitananda in the movie Chocolate, in which she is a young girl with autism and what is typiclly called by a seemingly derogratory term, “Idiot Savant.” This term is not ment to be insulting and it refers to a person who has a mental or learning disability and may have severe difficulties with the “simple” tasks of daily living but is EXTREMELY gifted in a one specific way, such as the performing of feats of memory or calculation. In this movie the character she plays is an autistic girl who learns martial arts from watching it on TV (Bruce Lee movies) and by watching some muay thai competitors kick at punching bags. She only needs to see the martial arts moves a few times and then she is able to replicate the move at just the right instant. I feel that this is the greatest martial arts movie ever made and it is an injustice that it has not received the popularity and awards that it deserves. This picture is intended to blend digital art with a slight bit of impressionism showing the "mood" of the motion. 

Yanin “Jeeja” Vismitananda (born March 31, 1984) is a Thai actress & martial artist who specializes in Taekwondo (but uses Jeet Kune Do Kung Fu in this movie). She plays the character Yanin Mitananda in the movie Chocolate, in which she is a young girl with autism and what is typiclly called by a seemingly derogratory term, “Idiot Savant.” This term is not ment to be insulting and it refers to a person who has a mental or learning disability and may have severe difficulties with the “simple” tasks of daily living but is EXTREMELY gifted in a one specific way, such as the performing of feats of memory or calculation. In this movie the character she plays is an autistic girl who learns martial arts from watching it on TV (Bruce Lee movies) and by watching some muay thai competitors kick at punching bags. She only needs to see the martial arts moves a few times and then she is able to replicate the move at just the right instant. I feel that this is the greatest martial arts movie ever made and it is an injustice that it has not received the popularity and awards that it deserves. This picture is intended to blend digital art with a slight bit of impressionism showing the "mood" of the motion. 

Yanin “Jeeja” Vismitananda (born March 31, 1984) is a Thai actress & martial artist who specializes in Taekwondo (but uses Jeet Kune Do Kung Fu in this movie). She plays the character Yanin Mitananda in the movie Chocolate, in which she is a young girl with autism and what is typiclly called by a seemingly derogratory term, “Idiot Savant.” This term is not ment to be insulting and it refers to a person who has a mental or learning disability and may have severe difficulties with the “simple” tasks of daily living but is EXTREMELY gifted in a one specific way, such as the performing of feats of memory or calculation. In this movie the character she plays is an autistic girl who learns martial arts from watching it on TV (Bruce Lee movies) and by watching some muay thai competitors kick at punching bags. She only needs to see the martial arts moves a few times and then she is able to replicate the move at just the right instant. I feel that this is the greatest martial arts movie ever made and it is an injustice that it has not received the popularity and awards that it deserves. This picture is intended to blend digital art with a slight bit of impressionism showing the "mood" of the motion. 

Yanin “Jeeja” Vismitananda (born March 31, 1984) is a Thai actress & martial artist who specializes in Taekwondo (but uses Jeet Kune Do Kung Fu in this movie). She plays the character Yanin Mitananda in the movie Chocolate, in which she is a young girl with autism and what is typiclly called by a seemingly derogratory term, “Idiot Savant.” This term is not ment to be insulting and it refers to a person who has a mental or learning disability and may have severe difficulties with the “simple” tasks of daily living but is EXTREMELY gifted in a one specific way, such as the performing of feats of memory or calculation. In this movie the character she plays is an autistic girl who learns martial arts from watching it on TV (Bruce Lee movies) and by watching some muay thai competitors kick at punching bags. She only needs to see the martial arts moves a few times and then she is able to replicate the move at just the right instant. I feel that this is the greatest martial arts movie ever made and it is an injustice that it has not received the popularity and awards that it deserves. This picture is intended to blend digital art with a slight bit of impressionism showing the "mood" of the motion. 

The movie Hero was about the dictatorship and his wars during which much blood was shed, but in the dictator's mind, and in the mind of many others from that generation, war was the only way to unite all of China as one world power. The movie stars Jet Li, Donnie Yen, & Ziyi Zhang / Xiyi Xang.

The movie Hero was about the dictatorship and his wars during which much blood was shed, but in the dictator's mind, and in the mind of many others from that generation, war was the only way to unite all of China as one world power. The movie stars Jet Li, Donnie Yen, & Ziyi Zhang / Xiyi Xang.

The movie Hero was about the dictatorship and his wars during which much blood was shed, but in the dictator's mind, and in the mind of many others from that generation, war was the only way to unite all of China as one world power. The movie stars Jet Li, Donnie Yen, & Ziyi Zhang / Xiyi Xang.

This is a phone-photograph of what I call, my spiritual sanctuary.  It is cluttered because I have so many sculptures, pictures, and Asian weapons which all have sentimental meaning to me.  Although this room is cluttered, it provides me with a sanctuary to which I may retreat when I need to meditate, rest, or engage in writing, producing pictures, listening to music, journaling, working on my Wing Chun website, or just deeply contemplating some aspect of my life.  Many of the artifacts that are in this room have been given to me by those who know me well and love me none-the-less.  This room is a beautiful, peaceful place to retreat whether it is to retreat within this room, retreat into my mind, and / or retreat into a state of spiritual, mindful mediation.  This room is just another one of the infinite reasons I have to be grateful and extend my gratitude to the grace of God.

Thank you for your interest:
Sincerely with honor,
Disciple Dragon Snake
“Dìzǐ Lóng Shé”
弟子龙蛇
Email:  CONTACT@PROGRESSIVEWINGCHUN4U.COM
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